Performance, Perspective and Control in Jackie (2016)

I’ve recently had an abstract accepted for the rather exciting conference, Revisiting the Gaze: Feminism, Fashion and the Female Body. My friend Jacki Willson (author of The Happy Stripper: Pleasures and Politics of the New Burlesque and Being Gorgeous: Feminism, Sexuality and the Pleasures of the Visual) told me about it and suggested it would probably be of interest to me.

My writing tends to be historical in focus (not surprising really, I’m part of the Cinema and Television History Research centre at DMU). I’m repeatedly drawn to American cinema and its (often deeply problematic) representation of women and to how these representations may speak to and about audiences and culture, both at the time of their production and thereafter. Continue reading

Another chance to download my Bunny Yeager article free.

For the next 48 hours my Bunny Yeager article is available free from Feminist Media Histories as part of their Women’s History Month offer.

N.B. The window for the free download has now expired, anyone who can’t access the paper through their library send me a message.

Book Review for the journal ‘Cultural Sociology’

9781479864775_FullThis Year’s Model: Fashion, Media, and the Making of Glamour

Elizabeth A. Wissinger

New York University Press, New York, 2015, 353 pages, ISBN 978-1-47986477-5

 

Using the figure of the model, Elizabeth A. Wissinger successfully ‘draw[s] back the curtain to reveal the magical workings of the glamour machine’ (2015: 2) examining the intersection of consumerism, conduct, desire and femininity in Western popular culture.

In her introduction she introduces the notions of ‘glamour labor’, examining the model’s ability to embody and convey ‘affect’ and begins to explore the current value of these two skills across a number of historical moments including the current age, which she argues is notable for its preoccupation with the image and instantaneousness and she terms, borrowing from journalist Malcolm Gladwell, the ‘regime of the blink’.

Continue reading

Podcast #1 – An interview with Heidi Bang Tidy and Lady Wildflower

hebden_grande

image courtesy of James Lynch.

In this podcast, I talk to Heidi Bang Tidy and Lady Wildflower, co-producers of the award-winning Hebden Bridge Burlesque Festival. We discuss the politics of burlesque, the history of the festival and this year’s round table discussion I Am Woman, Hear Me Phwoar featuring Myself, Dr Claire Nally and Dr Jacki Willson (and others tbc) on the Sunday of this year’s festival.  I also discuss my broader research and engagement project in more detail.

Windmill Girls Project

 

Me outside The Windmill circa 2010 and a selection of Windmill programmes

For those who aren’t familiar, The Windmill Theatre is a little variety theatre nestled in the heart of Soho, just off Shaftesbury Avenue. It is famous for its nude tableau and fan dancing, its careful negotiation of the respectable middlebrow and for giving first breaks to some of British variety’s most celebrated performers. However the theatre is probably best remembered for its steadfast determination to remain open through the compulsory closure of all London theatres and throughout the Blitz, to provide patriotic, upbeat entertainment for war weary troops and civilians. It was and still is, a British institution. Continue reading

In the money!

dmulocalcert

Today was a good day. I spent the evening with my work colleagues and we headed on to Prof Ian Hunter’s book launch for his latest book Cult Film as a Guide to Life where the brave amongst us enjoyed a screening of John Waters’ notorious 1972 cult classic Pink Flamingos. But prior to this I’d had some rather exciting news.

I am thrilled to say that despite tight competition, I found out that I won just over £600 worth of #DMUlocal/#DMUengage funding to cover the cost the exciting Windmill Girls public engagement project I have now entitled #TheyNeverClothed: A Peep at the Women of the Windmill Theatre!

This money certainly will help in terms of covering the cost of putting the actual exhibition together and being able to pay for other aspects of the project and its dissemination.

I was relieved, excited and I must say, rather embarrassed when I discovered I had won, as I found out second-hand, as I had other commitments and couldn’t attend the ceremony! What a lovely surprise though!

I guess it is time to knuckle down and do some proper organising then!

Free Cheesecake – this week only

My article on Bunny Yeager, ‘Having her Cheesecake and Eating It’, in the journal Feminist Media Histories is available to download FOR FREE FOR THIS WEEK ONLY!

If you are into retro culture, pin-up photography, feminism and sexploitation cinema, this SHOULD be right up your street.14915144_607211236129893_3543917913881494731_n

FMH say:
In this week’s free article download, Ellen Wright writes about the life and work of photographer Bunny Yeager in “Having her Cheesecake and Eating it: Performance, Professionalism and the politics of the Gaze in the Pin-Up Self Portraiture of Bunny Yeager.”
Wright demonstrates how Yeager “embodied a mode of professional and sexual agency that engaged with broader, progressive ideas pertaining to women’s labor and identity circulating in 1960s America as part of feminism’s second wave.”
Free to download from our website for the next 7 days…

So simply hop on over to their page by giving the image above a click and give it a
download.
Oh! And don’t forget to let me know what you thought…

A Certain Type of Audience – A short essay written for pin-up artist Melanie Adams

smithburlyhouse

image courtesty of Phyll Smith. Taken at the Slipper Room, NY.

Audiences have always been key to burlesque. Not just in the obvious sense, as the means of financially sustaining the form, but their obvious and vocal presence has been key to the success of many a burlesque act and has very much helped to shape broader perceptions of the form.

Burlesque audiences have historically inspired panic and condemnation because of the sexualised nature of the burlesque form and because of the bad behaviour that it was assumed that this form would inspire or arouse in these audiences, who were often presumed to not know any better. They were too bawdy, too large, too demonstrative. In short they weren’t a polite, middle class audience and this got up some people’s noses.

When burlesque trailblazer Lydia Thompson and her ‘British Blondes’ first appeared at New York’s Wood’s theatre, on September 28th 1868, the novelty of scantily-clad, saucy, subordinate women, who showed their legs, directly challenged the audience and mischievously parodied events and celebrities of the day in the manner of current day British performers such as Abigail Collins or Glory Pearl (AKA The Naked Standup), she attracted considerable critical acclaim and a large, respectable, middle class audience. However, this audience, always hungry for the latest sensation, eventually became bored. Thompson and her Blondes ultimately became a source of vilification and moral speculation and the ‘leg show,’ as burlesque had come to be known, lost its cultural cachet, becoming increasingly associated with working class audiences, in less prestigious theatres and in less prominent and salubrious parts of American cities. Continue reading

Feminist Media Histories: Bunny Yeager podcast!

14449826_588230834694600_8832240371205123592_nI’m featured in the first ever Feminist Media Histories podcast! Sharing air time with the wonderful Hilary Hallett and Lois Banner, all talking about our contributions to the current issue of FMH on Histories of Celebrity with Feminist Media Histories editor Shelley Stamp.

In the interview i discuss my work on Bunny Yeager and 1960s celebrity culture, which features in the current issue (for more details, see previous posts). So give it a listen and if you’re feeling fruity, give it a share too. The podcast also includes the special issue’s guest editor Hilary A. Hallett talking about gender and histories of celebrity, and an interview with Lois Banner, whose article concentrates on the feminism of the Great Garbo.